Dreamy Dinner

Garlicky Sweet Potato Noodle Pasta

Delicious vegan garlic Alfredo sauce over sweet potato noodles! This is a simple, healthy, flavourful, and satisfying dinner for everyone!

Garlicky Sweet Potato Noodle Pasta

Ingredients

Sauce

  • 1 cup raw cashews
  • 3 cloves garlic ( add more or less to taste)
  • 4-5 Tbsp nutritional yeast 
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 2 tsp arrowroot starch (or cornstarch for thickening)
  • 1 1/2 – 2 cups unsweetened plain almond milk
  • 1 pinch red pepper flakes (optional//omit for less spicy)

Noodles

  • 3 medium sweet potatoes (peeled and spiralized)

For Serving

  • Fresh chopped parsley
  • Sautéed kale
  • Vegan Parmesan Cheese
  • Red pepper flakes

 

directions

  1. Add cashews to a small mixing bowl and cover with very hot water to soak for 30 minutes. Then drain thoroughly and set aside. (or soak cashews overnight or 6-8 hours in cool water).
  2. If serving with sautéed kale, prepare now and set aside until serving.
  3. While cashews finish soaking, peel and spiralizer potatoes using a veggie spiralizer on the thinnest blade. Or if you don’t own a spiralizer, you can use a vegetable peeler or julienne peeler instead. Set aside.
  4. Add soaked and drained cashews to a high-speed blender. Then add remaining ingredients: garlic, nutritional yeast, salt, arrowroot starch, and almond milk.
  5. Blend on high until creamy and smooth, scraping down sides as needed. Taste and adjust flavour as needed, adding more garlic, nutritional yeast for “cheesiness,” salt for saltiness, or a pinch of red pepper flake for heat. The sauce should be creamy, smooth, and pourable. If too thick, think with a bit more almond milk.
  6. Transfer sauce to a large, rimmed pan or pot and heat over medium-low heat until it just starts to bubble. Whisk as it heats, as it will thicken. Once bubbling reduce heat to a very low simmer to keep warm. The sauce will thicken, so thin with more almond milk if needed.
  7. Add 1 inch water to a large pot and top with a steamer basket (if you don’t have a steamer basket, see notes). Heat over medium-high heat and once bubbling, add potato noodles. Cover to let steam for 3-5 minutes. Be careful not to steam too long or the noodles can become soggy.
  8. Add your sweet potatoes to your sauce and gently toss to combine. If adding kale or other add-ins, add at this time.
  9. Serve as is or garnish with fresh parsley, kale, vegan parmesan, or red pepper flakes.
  10. This dish is best when fresh, as the noodles tend to get soggy after reheating, but the flavour is still delicious!

Notes

  • If you don’t have a steamer basket, sauté sweet potato noodles in a bit of oil in a large rimmed skillet for 5-7 minutes, gently stirring. 
  • To save time you can also buy store-bought spiralized sweet potato noodles.

Did you make this recipe?

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Pomegranate

Pomegranates contain two plant compounds with powerful medicinal properties; punicalagins which are extremely potent antioxidants found in the juice and punicic acid which contains a main fatty acid that can help protect against several steps in the heart disease process. They have shown to reduce inflammatory activity in the digestive tract, and they can block enzymes that are known to damage joints in people with osteoarthritis. The anti-bacterial and anti-fungal effects may also be protective against infections and inflammation in your mouth including, gingivitis, periodontitis, and denture stomatitis.

Winter Squash

Apples

Beets

Winter Squash

Winter squash has been shown to help steady the release of sugar inside of our digestive tract after being eaten, and to lessen our overall glycemic response to meals. The vivid orange flesh of many winter squash varieties is due to their amazing concentration of carotenoids. Among these carotenoids are beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and other carotenoids that can be converted into active forms of vitamin A and shown to have an abundant amount of antioxidant properties. Winter squash is also a great source of vitamin C, a healthy source of fibre and contain polysaccharides that help regulate and control blood sugar.

Apples

Beets

Carrots

Apples

Apples are a rich source of manganese, copper, vitamins A, E, B1, B2, and B6 along with polyphenols. To get the most out of your apple, leave the skin on – it contains half of the fiber and many of the polyphenols. They have been linked to a lower risk of heart disease because the contain soluble fiber – the kind that can help lower your blood cholesterol levels. Apples also contain pectin, a type of fiber that acts as a prebiotic, which means it feeds the good bacteria in your gut and helps the good bacteria turn into other helpful compounds that circulate back through the body.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is high in fiber, which is important because it feeds the healthy bacteria in your gut that help reduce inflammation and promote digestive health. Consuming enough fiber may help prevent digestive conditions like constipation, diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is a great source of antioxidants, particularly high in glucosinolates and isothiocyanates, two grounds of antioxidants that have been shown to slow the growth of cancer cells. Cauliflower is also high in choline, an essential nutrient that many people are deficient in and contains some of almost every vitamin and mineral that you need.

Beets

Beets are very low in cholesterol and saturated fat, they are a very good source of dietary fiber, folate, potassium and manganese, and they ae a good source of vitamin C, iron and magnesium. Beets are rich in nitrates (which is converted into nitric oxide by the body), which helps to relax and dilate the blood vessels, resulting in better circulation and a drop in blood pressure. The added oxygen flow in your blood doesn’t just go to your muscles, it goes to your brain too, which improves cognitive function. Beets contain fiber, with most of that being insoluble fiber which is a type of fiber that promotes the movement of material through your digestive system and increases stool bulk, so it can benefit those who struggle with constipation. Last but not least, beets can help reduce the intensity of chronic inflammation because they contain the amino acid betaine, which is an anti-inflammatory.

Carrots

Cauliflower

Pomegranate

Carrots

Carrots are good for your eyes. This is probably the best-known carrot superpower. They’re rich in beta-carotene, a compound your body changes into vitamin A, which helps keep your eyes healthy. And beta-carotene helps protect your eyes from the sun and lowers your chance of cataracts and other eye problems. They can lower your risk of cancer. Antioxidants have been proven to fight off harmful free radicals in your body, and that can make you less likely to have cancer. The two main types of antioxidants in carrots are carotenoids and anthocyanins. Lastly, all those antioxidants are great for your heart, the potassium can help keep your blood pressure in check and they have fiber, which can help you stay at a healthy weight.

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